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20121027
20121104
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
and jobs. we have a large energy sector. education is a big issue. among the latino population and especially democrats, immigration reform. host: the demographics of the voters in colorado? guest: 52% women, 40% men. we have increased the number of people were voting by mail. 800,000 people have already cast ballots in this state. it is equally divided. one-third of the electorate is a registered republican, won third democrat, one-third unaffiliated. everyone is plan for the group of unaffiliated voters. you'll hear a lot about appealing to women and latinos. we have heard a lot about the bennett strategy and that is the strategy center michael bennett used in running against the tide in 2010. where by appealing to women and latinos he was able to pull a victory in a year or not favorable to democrats. host: where are the traditionally democratic areas of the state? guest: denver is ground zero for democrats. boulder would be another. they have large registration bases in arapahoe m jefferson county. surprisingly, the fifth biggest county for democratic voter registration is
't know -- maybe you can answer, maybe you can give me some sort of education on this. but for the most part, i mean, naturally animals in the wild do they naturally go after their own sex to reproduce? i don't think so. age sex is -- >> let me answer the caller in very direct terms. sex orientation is a characteristic of being human. i think put more simply, i was born this way no different than straight americans were born straight. one of the questions that i always like to ask people when we're having this conversation is when did you choose to be straight? people think about that for three or four seconds and they're like well i didn't choose to be straight, i was born this way. well the same applies to me. i can assure you that nothing happened. i didn't really have a conversation with myself and decide to be gay. god made me this way and i'm very proud of that. and so to the extent that we understand that the caller was born straight and i was born gay and we're able to kind of get over that understanding, then i think we come to an easy conclusion that we both deserve to be trea
to the realization that we are dealing with education regurgitation. because you said trust in government through natural disaster. could we trust so-called government in getting in to illegal unfunded wars or trust the government dealing with hiding fascist trade agreements or $4 for a gallon of gas? so, no, we can't trust the government. but the problem is the question. because the government is the people. if you go to the constitution, it is a government for the people by the people. and if you look at the election process that is going on today with unlimited campaign financing, you cannot get further from one citizen and one vote, a government for the people by the people. so i can turn on c-span or g.e. or fox or time warner or disney or i can tune in to clear channel or any old fox radio, "wall street journal," and you are just bombarded 24 hours a day seven days a week with -- even the question that you are asking on the screen is an insane thought that somehow these politicianless and billionaires equal government.e billionaires equal government.s billionaires equal government. billiona
has to appeal to the swing areas. more independent voters. and you had this educated, affluent group, the base around ohio state university. and that has been critical. in the end, if you show that map, ohio is broken up, we have said it for years into 5 ohios. those five areas, plus some of the border areas, we have about seven media markets. it makes a very expensive to campaign here. in gubernatorial races and some presidential races there will go to west virginia to reach the southern ohio parts. that is where the bigger market is and that has to be part of the mix, too. ohio is five ohios. host: we talked about the issues, the top issues in ohio in this election cycle -- can we talk about the issues? guest: this is like to been a shock to your viewers, but the auto issue has been huge here. i have never seen where one issue in the campaign can play so well here. obviously, it is the battle of the bailout. who wanted to take it into bankruptcy. who got hurt, who did not. you are seeing the new ones being played on. and you are seeing the big swing, which is on the president's sid
educational levels in the state on average. it tends to be the most democratic region. if you go down to and tidewater, roads, that is a heavy defense industry area. it is both white-collar and blue-collar, also has a large african-american population. and it also has a relatively low nativity rate, that is people not necessarily born in virginia, due to the influence of the navy. the navy brings lots of people in from across the nation and across the world. the richmond area is an urban area, but it's probably the most conservative urban region in this area and maybe one of the most conservative in the country. of course, is a traditional area, particularly because of the west side of richmond, the city of richmond, the east side is heavily african-american and the west side is predominately white and his conservative with a high nativity rate. some of the surrounding counties have become more diverse over the years, but by and large it is also a conservative suburban ex-urban area. those are three. you may include far south virginia and a world unto itself. it used to be substantial
of the other things, education, a lot of things that are being battered around, people need to really dig and find out what the educational programs are all about. it is more money, more money, all for the unions. if there were better things going on in the schools that the parents could see instead of being pushed aside because the government wants to take over the children and not let the parents have anything to say. there are also other subjects for the middle class. host: i will give mr. bennett a chance to respond. guest: i think all voters should have an opportunity to look behind the ad than delving into the research on the individual candidates. if they would, i think they would come out knowing that this country needs a change in direction in this country needs somebody who's going to create the number of jobs necessary. i think it gov. mitt romney has that program. his commitment to produce 12 million jobs over the next four years is the way this country needs to do it. also, take regulation out of the small business communities so that our small businessmen, the real job creat
, education, health care. this is growing a lot due to the president's policies. he has had to combat the governor and many members of chairman gleason's party who have tried to stymie that growth. we want to see those policies take hold in continue to grow. one other issue he spoke about, the voter i.d. law, there is still confusion in the commonwealth. the severed by the republican party in pennsylvania and for governor corbett's administration to confuse people, which they do not, is something that i think was designed to suppress certain votes. i'm not suggesting that was his motive, but it is the motive of some republican. it is unconstitutional. people who want to vote, if they do not have an id, they can still go to the polls and have their constitutional records looked at. they will be asked for their photo id. the use of photo id has been accepted by both parties. it is something that is absolutely critical since terrorists attacked us. the right thing to do is to show photo id. the democrats are worried about pennsylvania. in 2010, we won the u.s. senate seat and the governo
social security, medicare, and education. that's why i support a balanced budget amendment to the constitution. >> the race to succeed retiring new mexico senator akaka is just one of the key house or senate government races you can follow on c-span.org. -- house, senate, and governor races. >> "washington journal" continues. host: we are highlighting key battleground states of campaign 2012. today we put a spotlight on iowa. joining us from des moines is a senior political writer with the associated press, mike glover. what is the economy like in the iowa? guest: the economy is probably better than the rest of the country. it's not great, but we have not suffered the depths of the recession that some other parts of the country have. the economy is less of an issue than it is in many other places around. basically because the farm economy is pretty good this year. commodity prices aren't up, land prices -- commodity prices are up as well as land prices. so there's not a lot of economic uncertainty. host: what are the top issues that iowa voters are thinking? guest: it depen
. they register under the tax code 501 c 4. the organizations that are primarily about educating people about issues or policy options and things like that but they're allowed to do some political activity. it can't be the main thing they're about. the decisions from 2010 that are so famous they can be more specific in the way they're involved. the things that define the elections are -- because they're mainly about enl indicating people have been able to do that without disclosing the sources of the money that they've gotten. so tense or hundreds of millions of dollars being spent without us knowing where it actually came from. host: let's go to our democrats line. caller: what i would like to say about this money, i feel like this money is basically it's generations of money which a lot of elderly white people have built up over time when the system was discriminatory. now they have come out and decided to buy an election. this money is not taxed or nothing. they need to start taxing this money at 90%. if the rich people don't want to pay more taxes, they want to take the tax money because
conflict for this country? caller: is an formative. as long as people are educating themselves. you hear a lot of rhetoric from people. it i don't have to tell you this. there is a lot of partisan talk every once in a while but we are locked in. the population that vote for these people -- i am in a red state so it does not matter who i vote for. i am going to vote for ron paul. it is a hassle and everybody is going to see it. having said that, those same people are going to go back to washington and at the same people who voted them in are going to be screaming and hollering. i am going to do it my way, and then nobody is going to change. host: as we just showed you a picture on the front page of " the new york times," in new jersey where some of the storm damage at the end. joining us on a line is representative john runyan, a republican from new jersey. representative, can you tell us about some of the damage in your district in new jersey? guest: thank you for having me on. i had the opportunity yesterday to walk around on the ground. i know the president and gov. christie saw from t
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)